King and Queen

Problem #53

Tags: games geometry

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Programming of game playing algorithms, like Chess, have two principal tasks:

Let us start by solving a simple problem:

There is a chessboard with 8 x 8 squares. There are the White King and Black Queen on it. Check whether the Queen could take the King.

Remember - Queen could move to any distance vertically, horizontally or along any of two diagonals.

8  - Q - - - - - -     - - - - - - - -
7  - - - - Q - - -     - - - - - - Q -
6  - - - - - - - -     - - - - - - - -
5  - - - - - - - -     - - - Q - - - -
4  - K - - - - Q -     - - Q - - - - -
3  - - - - - - - -     - - - - - - - -
2  - - - Q - - - -     - - - - - K - -
1  - - - - - - - -     - Q - - - - - -
   a b c d e f g h     a b c d e f g h

See these two examples, with schematically drawn boards. On both the King is shown with letter K while marks Q shows variants of placing the Queen.

Notice how the squares of the board are addressed. Columns (called files) are marked with latin letters from a to h, while rows (called ranks) are marked with digits from 1 to 8. So the King on the left diagram sits on the b4 square - and on the right diagram on the f2. We shall use this notation.

Input data contain the number of test-cases in the first line.
Next lines describe placement of the King and Queen for each testcase, by specifying their squares (King's first).
Answer should give only letter Y or N for each of test-cases, meaning that King could be taken or not respectively. Separate letters with spaces.

Example:

input data:
8
b4 b8
b4 e7
b4 d2
b4 g4
f2 b1
f2 c4
f2 d5
f2 g7

answer:
Y Y Y Y N N N N

In this example the positions are taken from both of diagrams above - cases 1..4 from the left diagram and others from the right.

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